The Fifth Grade Syllabus contains detailed daily lesson plans for Religion, Mathematics, Language Arts, Spelling, Poetry, Science, History, Geography, Latin, Art and Music. It also contains a variety of teaching resources including Fifth Grade Subject Rubrics and Learning Objectives, suggested daily schedules, and teaching tips. We have provided below a sample of the first week from the syllabus along with a list of the books used in the syllabus.

In Religion we use Credo: I Believe (Faith & Life) and St. Joseph's Baltimore Catechism, No. 2 to teach the basic truths of our Faith. In Mathematics we use Math 65 (Saxon) which uses the spiral approach to teaching mathematical concepts. In Language Arts we recommend continuing Intermediate Language Lessons (Serl) from last year for continued practice in punctuation, capitalization, grammar, and creative writing. In Spelling we recommend continuing to use The Writing Road to Reading along with Starting a Spelling Notebook. In Poetry we continue to use The Harp and Laurel Wreath for selections of poetry to memorize. In Science we recommend either Concepts and Challenges in Science 1 (A) or Concepts and Challenges in Earth Science which have excellent presentations and fit well with the aim of our program because they concentrate on basic formation and not on the accumulation of complex data. In History we continue Pioneers and Patriots (Furlong) to study American History from the Revolutionary War to the Civil War. We also provide the student with a list of historical fiction to complement the study of history through literature. In Geography we use the Ultimate Geography and Timeline Guide to continue a more serious study of geography. In Latin we use Beginning Latin II or Beginning Latin III to continue the formal study of Latin. In Art we use the Drawing Textbook (McIntyre) for continued drawing practice along with the Art 5 for Young Catholics (Seton) for art appreciation. In Music we use Alfred's Essentials of Music Theory and Meet the Great Composers along with classical music selections for music appreciation.

Current Edition: © 2016.

Online versions of the MODG syllabi are provided to enrolled families free of charge. Paper copies of the syllabi are also available for purchase from the MODG office, with a 30% discount for enrolled families.

Book List

English
  • Essential 4
    • Intermediate Language Lessons
      Serl, Emma
      Hillside Education — 339 Pages
      ISBN: 0965273571
    • Starting a Spelling Notebook: A Nuts and Bolts Guide to The Writing Road to Reading
      McAlister, Mari
      Mari McAlister — 40 Pages
    • The Harp and Laurel Wreath: Poetry and Dictation for the Classical Curriculum
      Berquist, Laura
      Ignatius Press — 500 Pages
      ISBN: 0898707161
    • The Writing Road to Reading
      Spalding, Romalda Bishop
      Collins Reference — 480 Pages
      ISBN: 0062083937
Fine Arts
  • Essential 6
    • Alfred's Essentials of Music Theory: Book 1
      Surmani, Andrew & Surmani, Karen Farnum & Manus, Morton
      Alfred Publishing Co., Inc. — 40 Pages
      ISBN: 0882848941
    • Drawing Textbook
      McIntyre, Bruce
      Audio-Visual Drawing Program
    • Meet the Great Composers - Book One
      Montgomery, June & Hinson, Maurice
      Alfred Publishing Co., Inc. — 72 Pages
      ISBN: 0882848550
    • Meet the Great Composers - Book Two
      Montgomery, June & Hinson, Maurice
      Alfred Publishing Co., Inc. — 72 Pages
      ISBN: 0739020560
    • The Rosary in Art (Art 5 for Young Catholics)
      Seton Home Study School
      Seton Press — 146 Pages
    • Parents with musical experience could replace this with alternate ear training activities.
    • Alfred's Essentials of Music Theory: Ear Training CD for Books 1 & 2
      Andrew Surmani, Karen Farnum Surmani, Morton Manus
      Alfred Publishing Co., Inc.
      ISBN: 0739027271
  • Supplemental - Required 2
    • Credo: I Believe Student Text (Faith and Life)
      Sockey, Daria M.
      Ignatius Press — 144 Pages
      ISBN: 158617567X
    • Peter and the Wolf (with CD)
      Schulman, Janet
      Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group — 40 Pages
      ISBN: 0375824308
Foreign Language
  • Essential 4
    • Beginning Latin II - Answer Key
      Hayden, Margaret
      Mother of Divine Grace School
    • Beginning Latin II - Student Manual
      Hayden, Margaret
      Mother of Divine Grace School
    • Beginning Latin III - Answer Key
      Hayden, Margaret
      Mother of Divine Grace School
    • Beginning Latin III - Student Manual
      Hayden, Margaret
      Mother of Divine Grace School
  • Supplemental - Optional 4
Mathematics
  • Essential 4
    • Math 6/5: Solutions Manual
      Saxon & Hake
      Saxon Publishers — 320 Pages
      ISBN: 1591413265
    • Math 6/5: Student Text
      Saxon & Hake
      Saxon Publishers — 736 Pages
      ISBN: 1591413184
    • Math 6/5: Tests and Worksheets
      Saxon & Hake
      Saxon Publishers — 272 Pages
      ISBN: 1591413222
    • Math 65: An Incremental Development
      Saxon & Hake
      Saxon Publishers — 592 Pages
      ISBN: 1565770366
  • Supplemental - Optional 2
  • Alternate text that can replace an essential or required supplemental text 1
Religion
  • Essential 3
    • Credo: I Believe Activity Book (Faith and Life)
      Ignatius Press
      Ignatius Press — 136 Pages
      ISBN: 1586175750
    • Credo: I Believe Student Text (Faith and Life)
      Sockey, Daria M.
      Ignatius Press — 144 Pages
      ISBN: 158617567X
    • The New Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism (No. 2)
      Kelley, Fr. Bennet
      Catholic Book Publishing Corp — 264 Pages
      ISBN: 089942242X
Science
  • Essential 4
    • Concepts and Challenges in Earth Science
      Bernstein, Schachter, Winkler, & Wolfe
      Globe Book Company
      ISBN: 1556757395
    • Concepts and Challenges in Earth Science Teacher's Manual
      Hayden, Margaret
      Mother of Divine Grace School — 99 Pages
    • Concepts and Challenges in Science Book 1/5th Grade Science Teacher's Manual
      Berquist, Laura & Berquist, Michaela
      Mother of Divine Grace School — 92 Pages
    • Fifth Grade Science
      Winkler, Bernstein, Schachter, & Wolfe
      Mother of Divine Grace School
      ISBN: 0205099211
Social Studies
  • Essential 4
    • Our Pioneers and Patriots
      Furlong, Fr. Philip
      Tan Books — 505 Pages
      ISBN: 0895555921
    • Our Pioneers and Patriots Answer Key
      Furlong, Fr. Philip
      Tan Books — 94 Pages
      ISBN: 0895556065
    • States & Capitals Pocket Flash Cards
      Trend Enterprises
      Trend Enterprises
    • The Ultimate Geography and Timeline Guide
      Hogan & Wiggers
      GeoCreations, Ltd. — 353 Pages
      ISBN: 0966372204
  • Supplemental - Required 13
    • Abe Lincoln: Log Cabin to White House
      North, Sterling
      Random House Books — 160 Pages
      ISBN: 0394891791
    • Amos Fortune, Free Man
      Yates, Elizabeth
      Puffin Books — 192 Pages
      ISBN: 0140341587
    • Ben Franklin of Old Philadelphia
      Cousins, Margaret
      Random House Books
      ISBN: 0394903285
    • By the Great Horn Spoon!
      Fleischman, Sid
      Little, Brown Books
      ISBN: 0316286125
    • George Washington's World
      Foster, Genevieve
      Beautiful Feet Books — 357 Pages
      ISBN: 096438034X
    • Guns for General Washington
      Reit, Seymour
      Houghton Mifflin Harcourt — 160 Pages
      ISBN: 0152164359
    • Johnny Tremain
      Forbes, Esther
      HMH Books for Young Readers — 320 Pages
      ISBN: 0547614322
    • Kat Finds a Friend
      Stromberg, Joan
      Ecce Homo Press — 125 Pages
      ISBN: 0966468910
    • Lewis and Clark: Explorers of the American West
      Kroll, Steven
      Holiday House — 32 Pages
      ISBN: 0823412733
    • Robert E. Lee
      Roddy, Lee
      Mott Media — 169 Pages
      ISBN: 0915134403
    • The Long Road to Gettysburg
      Murphy, Jim
      HMH Books for Young Readers — 128 Pages
      ISBN: 0618051570
    • Wanted: Dead or Alive: The True Story of Harriet Tubman
      McGovern, Ann
      Scholastic Books — 64 Pages
      ISBN: 0590442120
    • The student can replace this with another world atlas.
    • World Atlas
      McNally, Rand
      Rand McNally & Co.
      ISBN: 0528965816
  • Supplemental - Optional 33
  • Mentioned in the syllabus, but not assigned 1

Samples

Week 1

Day Assignment
1

Read Chapter 1 of Credo: I Believe. Read the explanation aloud to your child or let him read it silently to himself, depending on his reading level and the manner of presentation he is used to. Read the questions and answers given in the text as well. Discuss this material with your student, concentrating on his comprehension. Try to think of questions that invite the child to retell particular points in his own words. “Why was the little engine able to pull the train over the mountain? Is this the kind of faith we are talking about here? Are the truths of the faith real whether we believe in them or not? What does the text tell us that faith is?“ These are the kinds of questions that will help the student accurately put the thought of each paragraph in his own words.

Avoid questions that are too general. “What is this chapter about? Can you tell me what faith is?” are examples of general questions that require more from the student than he is usually ready to give at this point of formation. The emphasis in fifth grade should be on, “What does the text say here?” rather than, “What is the argument?” Though this may seem like a small difference to us, it is in fact a real and significant difference to children.

One of my younger children once said reflectively, "Isn't it strange that though we can't see our mouths the spoon always goes straight in?" I laughed, thinking about what her face had looked like after her early meals. Of course, she doesn't remember the mess she made when she was learning to eat with a spoon, she just knows that now the spoon goes straight in.

Constructing an argument is a similar experience. Once you are used to finding the topic sentence in a paragraph, it seems very simple. When an adult answers a question, he knows what information will satisfy the questioner and the order in which it should be presented. But we tend to forget how hard that is to do at first. For this reason children should have their attention drawn first to what information is present in the text they are using, and they should be asked specific questions about what the text says in particular places. Eventually, at the next level of formation, the child will be able to construct the whole argument of the text in answer to a general question, but he’ll be better able to do that if he has his attention drawn to the parts of the argument one by one now.

2

Introduce the questions and answers of Lesson 1 of the Baltimore Catechism #2. We will be memorizing the questions and answers of the Baltimore Catechism this year because they are so well suited to memorization. Children find them much easier to retain than the questions and answers in the Faith and Life text. If you have been using the Baltimore Catechism #1 in past years, you will notice a great similarity between the questions and answers in the two catechisms. The differences are primarily by way of addition; the #2 has slightly fuller answers than the #1, in keeping with the children’s increased ability to memorize and to understand.

Start working on the questions and answers of Chapter 1. Follow the same procedure all year when introducing new questions and answers. First read the question and the answer while the student listens, then read the question again, and have your student try to answer it. If he can, great. If he can’t answer it, fine, just prompt him through it. Do it one more time, prompting him through it if necessary, and then go on to the next question. Resist the temptation to go over and over the new questions. Chances are good you will actually be setting up impediments to memorization by doing that. It is better, at least for the most part, to go over this information with the children orally. Though a fifth grade student can be given the text and told to memorize the questions and answers on his own, doing so will usually result in poorer memorization, and less comprehension, as well as in the loss of an opportunity to develop an important habit.

One should keep in mind that the spoken word is closer to the concept than the written word. The written word is a sign of the spoken word, which is itself a sign of the concept in the soul. Grasping higher and more difficult concepts is easier when the instruction is given orally.

Additionally, in our culture a great deal of instruction is given visually. Much of our teaching and learning is from what we read rather than from what we hear. In the memorization of these questions and answers our children have an opportunity to learn audially, in a context where the investment of time on the part of the teacher is minimal, but the results can have life-long importance. The information learned is important and the method whereby it is acquired is also formative.

3

Have your student do Chapter 1, Lesson 4 in the Activity Book. Also spend five minutes or less going over the questions and answers for Chapter 1 of the Baltimore Catechism. I recommend that you start your religion class with a five minute review all year long. This is important, first of all because it is an easy method that helps the child learn the important truths of the faith in such a way that they will stay with him forever. He won’t necessarily understand the doctrine he recites, certainly he won’t understand it perfectly, but it will be in his mind and heart for reflection later on in life when he needs it.

Secondly, this daily five minute review provides an opportunity to exercise the imagination and memory. Such exercise strengthens the faculties, and also makes them docile. It would be hard to overestimate the importance of having a docile, as well as strong, imagination. If the imagination is simply strong, not having docility as an additional quality, the student will find that it leads him, rather than him leading it. It becomes a master, rather than a good servant. One way to achieve a docile imagination is to require the faculty to remember not only what it is inclined to remember, but to remember what is asked of it, simply for that reason.

Try to keep these goals in mind as the year progresses. It can become tedious to review the questions and answers day after day, but if you can keep these goals in mind, and remember to keep the daily review to five minutes or less, you will be able to persist. Also, as the year goes on, introduce some variations to encourage interest. For example, have “Catechism Bee’s” and award holy card prizes to the winners. Or let your children ask you the questions for a change. (My children love this one, because they are so much better at the memorization than I am.) Or start awarding points for each perfect answer, and keep track of the points. When a student reaches 100 points, take him out to lunch!

4 Spend five minutes or less going over the questions and answers for Chapter 1 of the Baltimore Catechism.
Day Assignment
1 Lesson 1
2 Lesson 2
3 Lesson 3
4 Lesson 4
5 Lesson 5
Day Assignment
1 Lesson 1
2 Lesson 2
3 Lesson 3
4 Lesson 4
5 Lesson 5
Day Assignment
1 Start by reviewing Lessons 51 and 100. If you didn’t do these last year go over them today, anyway. Have your student find, or if that is not possible, you find an example of each of the rules reviewed in these lessons. (Check the index if you have trouble locating examples.)
2 Read the Preface again. Then do Lesson 101 orally with your child. There will be a number of exercises this year that involve oral reproduction, or retelling. This is an excellent language and memory exercise. It requires the student to see a whole, and to keep that whole in mind well enough to repeat the story in chronological order.
3

Do Lesson 102 with your student. Go over the selection, talking to your child about the mechanics of the passage. Note the capital letters, and the ending punctuation for each sentence. Go over the difficult words of the passage, noting their spelling. Then dictate and have your child write from your dictation as much of the selection as you can do in 20 minutes.

For this assignment, and all subsequent dictations, the dictation should be given as follows, unless otherwise noted:

  1. Read the passage aloud.
  2. Go over the passage with the student, noting all capitalizations, punctuation marks, and any words that might be difficult for the student to spell. Give the reasons for these, as well as noting that they exist. (These are ‘studied’ dictations, as opposed to ‘unstudied’ dictations.)
  3. Read the first sentence, and have the student repeat the sentence. Then have him write the sentence, with no further conversation until it is written. If the child talks, he is apt to forget what he is supposed to be writing. The goal is to dictate the passage only once, and to have the student maintain such focused attention that he can write what is to be written without further instruction.
  4. Read the second sentence, have the student repeat it and then write it.
  5. Read the third sentence, following the same pattern.
  6. When the whole passage has been dictated, have the student correct it by reading it back to you. When he does this he will not only say the words, but will also indicate the punctuation and capitalization and the reasons for them. Thus, for today’s lesson the student would say, “‘Long, long ago, two seeds lay beside each other in the earth, waiting.‘ The ‘L’ on ‘long’ is capitalized because it is the beginning of a sentence. There is a period after ‘waiting’, because it is the end of a sentence that is a statement. There is a comma after ‘long‘ to separate the two words (adverbs) modifying ago, and a comma after ago to separate the modifying phrase (adverb phrase) from the main part of the sentence. ‘Waiting’ is also separated from the main part of the sentence by a comma.”(Or “There is a comma after ‘long’, after ‘ago’ and after ‘earth’ to indicate natural pauses in speech.”) You will need to model this kind of response, and prompt the student through it at first, but as he becomes accustomed to answering in this way, he will be reinforcing the mechanics of writing in such a way that he will never forget them.
  7. Go over any words that you noted earlier as potential spelling problems.
4 Do Lesson 103. Have your student do #1 in writing, have him do all of # 2 orally. Then he can do three of the sentences in #2 in writing.
Day Assignment
1

Introduce “George Washington” by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benet. Work on the first stanza.

The first day a poem is introduced, the teacher should read the whole poem, and then repeat the first stanza. Then each line of the first stanza should be said, with the student repeating it after the teacher. The teacher should then say the first two lines together and have the student repeat them, and do the same with the next two lines. Then say the whole stanza, and have the student try to repeat it. If he can’t repeat it yet, that’s fine. Just prompt him through it, and remember that there will be many other opportunities to work on it.

2

Work on the first stanza of “George Washington” by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benet.

The second day the same procedure is followed, though the whole poem doesn’t need to be read every day. The idea is to have the student hear the lines he is to memorize, and have him practice repeating what he hears. As soon as he knows the lines and doesn’t need the teacher’s help, he should be allowed to say them on his own. Until that point, however, he should be cheerfully prompted through the stanza.

3

Work on the first stanza of “George Washington” by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benet.

The third day the same procedure is followed, though the whole poem doesn’t need to be read every day. The idea is to have the student hear the lines he is to memorize, and have him practice repeating what he hears. As soon as he knows the lines and doesn’t need the teacher’s help, he should be allowed to say them on his own. Until that point, however, he should be cheerfully prompted through the stanza.

4

Work on the first stanza of “George Washington” by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benet.

On the fourth day, the student should be invited to recite as much of the poem as he knows at this point.

Day Assignment
1 Follow the instructions for Day 1, p. 22. You will begin teaching the phonograms. Work on #3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 13-20, 22-24, 26. These will all be familiar.
2 Do Day 2, p. 22 of Mari’s Spelling Guide. Work on #2, 5, 7, 25. Reviewing p. 15 of the Guide can be helpful.
3 Do Day 3, p. 22. Work on #1, 6, 10, 12, 21, 24. Review all cards up to this point. Be sure to read the directions in Mari’s book.
4 Do Day 4, p. 22. Review phonograms 1-26. You will now start your Spelling Notebook. Be sure to become familiar with Mari’s “Spelling Rule Memory Aid”. Refer to it as you encounter rules in upcoming weeks.
Day Assignment
1 Measuring, Chapter 1. Today, start by reading the two-page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow) at the end of each paragraph. Do the Answer These. Read Finding Out More. (Note: Almost every chapter has a section called Answer These, and a section called Now Try These. We do not ask younger students to do all the Now Try These or Answer These. So often we will not include one of these sections in the plan, since typically we expect 5th Graders to use this text. However, if you have a student in Grades 6-8, and are using this text with them, please have them do all Answer These and Now Try These sections.)
2 Measuring, Chapter 2. Read the two-page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These.
3 Measuring, Chapter 3. Read the two-page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These.
4 Studying the Earth, Chapter 1. Read the two-page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These and Now Try These.
5 Studying the Earth, Chapter 2. Read the two-page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These. Read Finding Out More.
Day Assignment
1 Biology, Chapter 1. Read the two page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These and Now Try These. Do the experiment on p. 5 if you choose.
2 Biology, Chapter 2. Read the two page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These and Now Try These.
3 Biology, Chapter 3. Read the two page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These and Now Try This. Anytime there are activities mentioned in the text, you are welcome to do them. At least read Do This at Home on p.9.
4 Biology, Chapter 4. Read the two page presentation; answer in writing (with complete sentences) the “questions in blue” (these are the questions at the end of each paragraph indented by an arrow). Do Answer These and Now Try This.
Day Assignment
1 Begin by reviewing the states and capitals. Flashcards are a good way to do this. Hold them up one at a time to see which are remembered. Set aside any that are known. Choose five to begin to work on. Repeat these a few times.
2

Use one of the photocopied map pieces described earlier, or if you are going to use the Ultimate Geography and Timeline Guide, go over pp.154-155.

3 Review the five cards you chose on Monday.
4 Review all the cards from the ‘known’ pile, plus the five new cards, for 5 minutes or less.
Day Assignment
1

Start reading George Washington’s World by Genevieve Foster. This title is in print, and it is an excellent source of general information about the time in which George Washington lived. The book is a good read aloud, or the student can read it silently. In either case, at least 12 pages a day, five days a week, should be read to work through the text in a timely manner. As you read, or your student reads the text, have him enter the important people on his timeline. This will help fix in his mind what was going on elsewhere in the world at the time of the American Revolution.

Note: Over the course of the year, as you have time, you might like to check out this web-site: http://www.animatedatlas.com/movie.html which provides an animated look at the expansion of the United States. It has three parts, Part I: Completion of Territory (1789-1853); Part II: The Civil War (1853-1865); Part III: Post Civil War (1865-1959). During this year, you will be studying the time period covered in Parts I & II. Try to watch Parts I & II as you begin the corresponding time period, you are welcome to watch them more than once. You could watch Part III as well.

2

Keep reading George Washington’s World by Genevieve Foster.

3

Keep reading George Washington’s World by Genevieve Foster.

Read Unit V, “George Washington” (Chapter 22) on pp. 179-183 of Pioneers and Patriots, do the Study Summary orally and the Study Test in writing.

4

Keep reading George Washington’s World by Genevieve Foster. 

Extra or alternative reading: If You Grew Up With George Washington by Ruth Gross; The Bulletproof George Washington by Charles Barton (both are in print).

5

Keep reading George Washington’s World by Genevieve Foster.

Day Assignment
1

Lesson 1. Read the first lesson. Make flashcards for new vocabulary. Do Day 1 exercises. 

2

Lesson 1. Do Day 2 exercises. Practice vocabulary for five minutes. 

3

Lesson 1. Do Day 3 exercises. Practice vocabulary for five minutes.

4

Lesson 1. Take Quiz 1.

Day Assignment
1

Lesson 1. Review the charts given in the first lesson. These should all be review. If you do not have flashcards for the vocabulary words, make flashcards for the first twenty. (There are seventy words here: you will make flashcards for them over the first four weeks.) If you do have flashcards from last year, just use those. Oral Drill: conjugate “regere” and “audire” in the present, imperfect, and future tenses. Do the Day 1 exercises. Practice vocabulary for ten minutes.

Oral Drill Answer Key:

  • rego, regis, regit, regimus, regitis, regunt
  • regebam, regebas, regebat, regebamus, regebatis, regebant
  • regam, reges, reget, regemus, regetis, regent
  • regam, regas, regat, regamus, regatis, regant
  • audio, audis, audit, audimus, auditis, audunt
  • audiebam, audiebas, audiebat, audiebamus, audiebatis, audiebant
  • audiam, audies, audiet, audiemus, audietis, audient
  • audiam, audias, audiat, audiamus, audiatis, audiant

This text begins with a review of Beginning Latin 2. The student should be familiar with all the charts and vocabulary presented in the first lesson, even if some of them have slipped his memory. He is given the first four lessons to recommit these words/charts to memory and be able to apply the concepts in them. In Lesson 5, new concepts will be given.

2

Lesson 1. Do the Day 2 exercises. Practice vocabulary for ten minutes.

3

Lesson 1. Do the Day 3 exercises. Practice vocabulary for ten minutes.

4

Lesson 1. Take Quiz 1.

Day Assignment
1 Read ‘How to Use This Book’ in the beginning of the text. Keeping in mind the variety of methods of presentation Mr. McIntyre mentions, introduce Lesson 9 (pictures 49-54).
Day Assignment
1

Though Alfred’s Essentials for Music provides valuable music theory and Meet the Great Composers gives the lives of famous composers, the most important aspect of musical training comes from a regular exposure to the greatest musical works. Young children should listen to good music on a regular basis. I have included some suggestions for pieces to listen to, but any pieces by these composers would do just as well. I suggest that you listen to some classical music at least once a week, but in our house that time is not part of our formal schooling time, so I don’t include it in my suggested time per day. (If you would like to hear an excellent talk on the virtues of classical music, get Andrew Pudewa’s tape “Profound Effect of Music on Life”. His phone number is 800-856-5815.)

The classical pieces assigned in the syllabus can be found in a variety of places:

  • www.youtube.com
  • http://www.classicalarchives.com – a classical music web-site which lets you (as a “Free Member”) listen to five music files a day at no charge.
  • http://www.pandora.com/ - Pandora Radio lets you create at no charge your own “radio station” that only plays music which you like with limited advertisements. Please note: Occasionally Pandora displays advertisements of questionable moral content; parents are encouraged to supervise their children’s use of this site, as with any web-site. There is a ‘advertisement-free’ version of Pandora which costs a few dollars per month.
  • www.amazon.com – if you wish to purchase the recordings. 

 

Read the story of Johann Sebastian Bach in "Meet the Great Composers, Vol 1".

2

Do the 'Bach Word Search' today if you would like.